EMPOWERING WOMEN IN SCIENCE: SHARE YOUR STORY WITH DT-GEO

Every year on February 11th, we are reminded of the essential role that women and girls play in the field of science. This International Day of Women and Girls in Science brings a flurry of messages to our inboxes and social feeds, highlighting the invaluable contributions of female scientists. At DT-GEO, we cherish these contributions deeply. However, we believe that the recognition and celebration of female scientists should not be limited to a single day.

An Ongoing Commitment to Equality and Diversity

Understanding the importance of continuous acknowledgment, the DT-GEO Equality and Diversity Committee is taking a step further. Following the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, we are excited to announce the launch of a brief survey. This initiative invites you, our valued community, to share your stories and experiences with female scientific pioneers. We are looking to spotlight those whose work has not only advanced the field of geophysics and supercomputing but has also paved the way for future generations. Whether these pioneers are part of the DT-GEO project or shine in other areas, whether you’ve met them personally or have been inspired from afar, we want to hear from you.

Your Stories Matter


By participating in this survey, you’re not just sharing a story; you’re contributing to a larger narrative that celebrates and recognizes the critical role women play in science. These stories are not merely tales of individual achievement but are testaments to the collective progress we aim to foster within our community and beyond. They remind us that diversity in science not only enriches our research but also deepens our understanding of the world.

Join Us in This Initiative


In a month, we will be sharing your submissions and our collective calls to action on the DT-GEO official website. This is more than an invitation to contribute; it’s a call to join us in reinforcing our commitment to inclusivity and diversity in the scientific community. Your story could be the spark that inspires others, the recognition that empowers a future leader, or the acknowledgment that celebrates unsung heroes.

We warmly encourage you to share with us a story about a woman in science whose work has significantly impacted you or the field. Let’s ensure that the achievements of women in science are celebrated every day, not just once a year.

Share your story now and be a part of this pivotal movement towards a more inclusive and diverse scientific world.

 

Instantaneous physics-based ground motion maps using reduced-order modeling

TYPE OF PUBLICATION
Article in journal
 
YEAR OF PUBLICATION
2023
 
PUBLISHER
Geophysical Research Letters
 
 
AUTHORS
John M. Rekoske, Alice-Agnes Gabriel, Dave A. May
 
CITATION
Rekoske, J. M., Gabriel, A.-A., & May, D. A. (2023). Instantaneous physics-based ground motion maps using reduced-order modeling. Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth, 128, e2023JB026975. https://doi.org/10.1029/2023JB026975
 
SHORT SUMMARY

Physics-based simulations of earthquake ground motion are useful to complement recorded ground motions. However, the computational expense of performing numerical simulations hinders their applicability to tasks that require real-time solutions or ensembles of solutions for different earthquake sources. To enable rapid physics-based solutions, we present a reduced-order modeling approach based on interpolated proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) to predict peak ground velocities (PGVs). As a demonstrator, we consider PGVs from regional 3D wave propagation simulations at the location of the 2008 MW 5.4 Chino Hills earthquake using double-couple sources with varying depth and focal mechanisms. These simulations resolve frequencies ≤1.0 Hz and include topography, viscoelastic attenuation, and S-wave speeds ≥500 m/s. We evaluate the accuracy of the interpolated POD reduced-order model (ROM) as a function of the approximation method. Comparing the radial basis function (RBF), multilayer perceptron neural network, random forest, and k-nearest neighbor, we find that the RBF interpolation gives the lowest error (≈0.1 cm/s) when tested against an independent data set. We also find that evaluating the ROM is 107–108 times faster than the wave propagation simulations. We use the ROM to generate PGV maps for 1 million different focal mechanisms, in which we identify potentially damaging ground motions and quantify correlations between focal mechanism, depth, and accuracy of the predicted PGV. Our results demonstrate that the ROM can rapidly and accurately approximate the PGV from wave propagation simulations with variable source properties, topography, and complex subsurface structure.

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